How to save lives in Sepsis

What is Sepsis?

Sepsis is likened to the body’s inflammation process working ‘in overdrive’, with all parts of the body exacerbated rather than just the affected area. The inflammation process is designed to protect us but when Sepsis occurs, blood pressure drops, organs are not perfused and can fail and the patient can die from septic shock. Recognising and treating Sepsis earlier in the patient pathway is key to saving lives.

sepsis symptons

What are symptoms of Sepsis?

Early symptoms of sepsis may include:

  • a high temperature (fever) or low body temperature
  • chills and shivering
  • a fast heartbeat
  • fast breathing

In some cases, symptoms of more severe sepsis or septic shock (when your blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level) develop soon after.

These can include:

  • feeling dizzy or faint
  • a change in mental state – such as confusion or disorientation
  • diarrhoea
  • nausea and vomiting
  • slurred speech
  • severe muscle pain
  • severe breathlessness
  • less urine production than normal – for example, not urinating for a day
  • cold, clammy and pale or mottled skin
  • loss of consciousness


http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Blood-poisoning/Pages/Introduction.aspx

number of sepsis sufferers per year

How many people develop Sepsis?

In the developed world approximately 0.2 to 3 people per 1000 are affected by sepsis yearly, resulting in about a million cases per year in the United States and 27 million worldwide.

Sepsis claims more lives than cancer and is more common than heart attack. However, even in developed countries, fewer than half of the adult population have heard of it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sepsis

how many people die from sepsis

How many people die from Sepsis?

The risk of death from sepsis is as high as 30%, from severe sepsis as high as 50%, and from septic shock as high as 80%.

Rates of disease have been increasing.  Sepsis is more common among males than females. The medical condition has been described since the time of Hippocrates.  Septicemia and blood poisoning are terms that referred to the microorganisms or their toxins in the blood and are no longer commonly used.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sepsis

hospital costs from sepsis

How much is Sepsis costing health services?

Patients with these conditions are often treated in a hospital’s intensive care unit. Early aggressive treatment increases the chance of survival. In 2008, an estimated $14.6 billion was spent on hospitalizations for septicemia, and from 1997 through 2008, the inflation-adjusted aggregate costs for treating patients hospitalized for this condition increased on average annually by 11.9%.

Despite high treatment expenditures, septicemia and sepsis are often fatal. Those who survive severe sepsis are more likely to have permanent organ damage, cognitive impairment, and physical disability.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22142805

 

 

LiDCO hemodynamic monitoring save lives in sepsis

How can we save lives in Sepsis?

Clinical study shows reduced mortality with noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of shock

“Treatment of patients using the LiDCOplus monitor significantly reduced the observed mortality rate to 13% against 32% and 20% in the invasively monitored and 37% in the unmonitored patient groups”

The authors noted that “This study supports an association between the use of APCO monitoring and reduction in mortality in shock compared with traditional methods of monitoring.”

Hata J, Stotts C, Shelsky C, Bayman E, Frazier A, Wang J, Nickel E. Reduced mortality with noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of shock. J Crit Care. 2011;26(2):224.E1-8.

   

LiDCO are raising awareness for Sepsis

LiDCO have published an infographic to help raise awareness for Sepsis and highlighting the impact that LiDCO hemodynamic monitoring can make on patient’s lives.

Download Sepsis Infographic and World Sepsis Day Infographic.  Every year LiDCO are helping raise awareness for World Sepsis Day through a number of activities.

Watch the How to save lives in Sepsis video below…

Sepsis | Reduced mortality with noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of shock

Sepsis | Reduced mortality with noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of shock

Patient Population
ICU shock patients.

LiDCO Monitor
LiDCOplus.

Trial Design
Observational study comparing no hemodynamic monitoring vs pulmonary artery vs LiDCOplus managed shock patients.

Outcome Impact
Treatment of patients using the LiDCOplus monitor significantly reduced the observed mortality rate to 13% against 32% and 20% in the invasively monitored and 37% in the unmonitored patient groups.

Surviving Sepsis campaign | 2016

Surviving Sepsis campaign | 2016

Guidelines
Management of sepsis and septic shock.

Purpose
To provide an update to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012.

Appendices
Appendix 1. Recommendations and Best Practice Statement
Appendix 2. Comparison of Recommendations from 2012 to 2016

A rational approach to fluid therapy in sepsis

A rational approach to fluid therapy in sepsis

Patient population
Severe sepsis and septic shock.

Purpose
The purpose of this consensus is to provide support to the bedside clinician regarding the diagnosis, management and monitoring of shock.